Hill

biography

Hill

ANTHONY HILL was born in London (Great Britain) in 1930. From 1947 to 1951 Anthony Hill attended the St. Martin School of Art and the Central School of Art and Crafts in London. With Victor Pasmore, Kenneth Martin and others he founded the "Constructivist" group to carry out an organic research with a view to promoting a rigorous constructivist movement based in geometry. The first exhibition of the group was in 1951. Another took place in 1954, the specific theme being the relationship between the artist and the mechanical tool. Numerous others followed, nearly all accompanied by theoretical statements and statements of program. Hill established relationship with advanced artists throughout Europe: Vantongerloo, Kupka, Picabia, Sonia Delaunay, Seuphor and, later, Duchamp, Bill, Biederman. Hill himself explained that this interest in such different movements was basically due to an interest in an art which contained a thought, even if it was not necessarily rational. In fact, under the pseudonym of Redo, he also produced works of the Dada type, inspired above all by Duchamp. This is explained by the fact that Hill has always associated with his artistic activity a great critical interest which, where his works are concerned, has involved a careful control of formal choices, materials and procedures. This critical and reductive intent was already evident in the paintings and reliefs, solely in black and white, of the period 1953-56. The central theme is a study of the semantic foundations of the straight line and of the curve with reference to the mathematical laws, especially of progression. 1956-63 saw the production of the orthogonal reliefs, with the use of colored materials and the intention of making use of real light and space. His interest in Bill's work (Mobius strip) then led him towards topology and combinatorial and irrational mathematics. A series of mathematical studies followed, in some cases in collaboration with others. In 1963, with Frank Harari, he published "On the Number of Crossing of the Complete Graph," and in 1968, in the magazine Leonardo, his studies on Mondrian's composition. Subsequently he was invited to lecture at universities and scientific academies in London, New York, Buffalo, Montreal, Prague and was made an honorary member of these institutes. He had an exhibition at the Rijksmuseum Kröller-Muller do Otterlo in Holland in 1980 and an exhibition, with his alter ego, Redo, at the Knoedler Gallery in London. In 1983 a retrospective exhibition was held at the Hayward Gallery in London.

exhibitions